Jun 072017
 

Walk with the dinosaurs at Dinosaurs Alive in Winnipeg's Assiniboine Park Zoo

Dinosaurs Alive exhibit at Assiniboine Park Zoo in Winnipeg, Manitoba

When you visit a zoo, you expect to see species of animals that exist in the world today. You may see exotic animals from places far away or endangered species, but certainly not extinct species. Unless you visit the Dinosaurs Alive exhibit at Winnipeg’s Assiniboine Park Zoo. Granted, the life-sized animatronic dinosaurs aren’t living, breathing animals, but they move and roar and give visitors a sense of how they may have looked and moved millions of years ago.

Dinosaurs Alive first came to Assiniboine Park Zoo in the summer of 2016, which was when I visited. The exhibit returns for the summer of 2017. The exhibit is set in a wooded area with information about the dinosaurs displayed on signs along the path through the trees.

Walk with the dinosaurs at the Dinosaurs Alive exhibit at Assiniboine Park Zoo

The Age of the Dinosaurs lasted 180 million years. The Earth changed radically during that period. The stroll through Dinosaurs Alive takes you to different time periods and different parts of the world.

Walk with the dinosaurs at the Dinosaurs Alive exhibit at Assiniboine Park Zoo

Yangchuanosaurus, shown in the photograph at the top of this post, was a powerful meat eater with a large skull and sharp, serrated teeth. It was the top predator of late Jurassic China.

Omeisaurus, the giant of the Jurassic Period, at Dinosaurs Alive at ssiniboine Park Zoo in Winnipeg, Manitoba

Omeisauras, the giant of the Jurassic Period, weighed up to 8,500 kilograms and swallowed plants whole, using gastroliths, or stomach stones, to aid with digestion

Dinosaurs Alive at ssiniboine Park Zoo in Winnipeg, Manitoba

An unexpected roar from a dinosaur down the path may make you jump. Make Me Move signs along the path encourage visitors to make the robot dinosaurs move and make sounds. You can get a sense for the movements by watching the short video below.

Walk with the dinosaurs at the Dinosaurs Alive exhibit at Assiniboine Park Zoo

The “helmet head” of Pachycephalosaurus protected its tiny brain from injury during combat

Walk with the dinosaurs at the Dinosaurs Alive exhibit at Assiniboine Park Zoo

Despite its vicious looking teeth, the Spinosaurus lacked the bite of other theropods. The jaws and teeth were more suited to fish than tearing through skin and bone.

Walk with the dinosaurs at the Dinosaurs Alive exhibit at Assiniboine Park Zoo

Amargasaurus had a series of tall spines down its neck and along its back. The spines may have limited how high it could lift its head, forcing it to eat food lower to the ground.

Walk with the dinosaurs at the Dinosaurs Alive exhibit at Assiniboine Park Zoo

The Quetzalcoatlus was one of the largest flying creatures of all time

There were times the exhibit felt more like an amusement park than a zoo, but the natural wooded setting did help evoke a sense of what it might have been like to encounter one of the creatures in a prehistoric age, had humans existed at the time. The children I saw appeared to enjoy the exhibit, although it might be a bit scary for very young children.

Walk with the dinosaurs at the Dinosaurs Alive exhibit at Assiniboine Park Zoo

Dinosaurs Alive runs until October 9, 2017. Admission is included with regular Zoo admission. A new dinosaur, Tylosaurus pembinenis, has been added to this year’s exhibit, bringing the total of dinosaurs to 16. Tylosaurus pembinensis was a ferocious beast that ruled the waters which covered Manitoba during the Cretaceous period.

PIN ITWalk with the dinosaurs at the Dinosaurs Alive exhibit at Assiniboine Park Zoo in Winnipeg, Manitoba

If you enjoyed this post, sign up for Destinations Detours and Dreams monthly e-newsletter. Get behind the scenes information and sneak peeks ahead in addition to a recap of the month’s posts.  

  5 Responses to “Walk With The Dinosaurs”

  1. Looks like fun, Donna! I could see how dino-loving kids would get a big thrill from this exhibit. I wonder how the real animals at the zoo feel about it.

    • Deb, the dinosaurs are away from the other animals.They can’t see them. It’s possible some of them might hear the dinosaurs though. What would they think?

  2. Really nice setting for the dinosaurs. Realistic? Who knows but much more spacious and natural than most of the places where you see exhibits like this.

    • Ken, it didn’t feel particularly realistic to me, but dinosaurs in general seem hard for me to imagine as being real. The setting is nice, because it does give a good sense of the size and make them appear a bit more real.

  3. Wow! This truly seems like so much fun! I would love to do this soon, Donna!

Leave a Comment

107 Shares
Tweet
Share3
+12
Pin102