Phoenix Desert Botanical Garden Butterfly Exhibit

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Butterfly Exhibit at Phoenix Desert Botanical Garden

The delights of the Butterfly Exhibit at Phoenix’s Desert Botanical Garden

A glimpse of a butterfly as it flutters by is likely to bring a smile to your face. Its intricate design of colours and carefree, elusive flight speak of beauty and freedom. The metamorphosis from caterpillar to butterfly has become a metaphor for resurrections and transformation.

The Spring Butterfly Exhibit at Phoenix’s Desert Botanical Garden provided a wonderful opportunity to surround myself with butterflies.

Butterfly house with flowering plants at Phoenix Desert Botanical Garden
The butterfly house is filled with flowering plants and dishes of orange slices and nectar to feed the butterflies
A painted lady and two white peacock butterflies
A painted lady and two white peacock butterflies
Butterflies attracted to the orange slices at Phoenix Desert Botanical Garden
Butterflies attracted to the orange slices

Signs in the exhibit provide information about the butterflies. Butterflies need an air temperature of at least 60 degrees Fahrenheit (15.5 Celsius) to warm their wings for flying. Butterflies visit flowers for nectar, their main energy source. Butterflies roost in trees or plants during inclement weather and at night. They need at least 14 hours of rest a day.

Julia butterfly
Julia butterfly
White peacock butterfly
White peacock butterfly
Butterfly landing on shirt at Phoenix Desert Botanical Garden Butterfly Exhibit
Butterfly lands on a friend’s shirt
Luna moth
Luna moth

Butterflies and moths may look alike but there are differences. Butterfly bodies are usually thin and their antennae are clubbed. Moth bodies are often plump and hairy. The antennae of male moths are feathery. Butterflies are active during the day. Moths are active at night.

Zebra longwing butterfly
Zebra longwing butterfly
Pipevine swallowtail butterfly
Pipevine swallowtail butterfly

Butterflies on leaves at Phoenix Desert Botanical Garden Butterfly Exhibit

Desert Botanical Garden presents a butterfly exhibit in spring and another one in fall. The annual Spring Butterfly Exhibit usually starts in March and runs into May. The fall exhibit may start at the end of September and run until mid-November.

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PIN ITThe Desert Botanical Garden in Phoenix, Arizona has a delight Butterfly Exhibit every spring and fall. #Phoenix #Arizona #garden #butterfly

This post is linked to Travel Photo Mondays


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15 Comments

  1. This is a handy travel tip for our upcoming trip to Phoenix. Certainly adding the Desert Botanical Garden to our list of things to do.

  2. I’ve seen some of these butterfly exhibits in a few places that I’ve traveled to, but I’ve never been. The photos are lovely, and I think I’ll include a visit next time there’s an opportunity to tour a butterfly garden.

  3. I’ve only visited the Garden over the Christmas season. Seems like each season has its special draws~

  4. I had no idea Phoenix had a butterfly garden but I’m glad they’re preserving and protecting these endangered species. There is a large butterfly conservatory here in Niagara Ontario and I was told that butterflies are attracted to red clothing so I’m not surprised to see one landed on the red shirt in the photo!

  5. Hi Donna,
    I SO needed this post and your pretty photos this morning — Here it is March 26th and we have snow today in Michigan. This has been such a brutal winter that won’t end!

    Seeing the green vegetation and beautiful butterflies is a jolt of freshness and warmth. I thank you!
    Josie

  6. The exhibit looks lovely… We saw thousands of Monarch butterflies recently in a natural butterfly sanctuary high in the mountains near Morelia, Mexico. That’s where they migrate to overwinter before returning back to eastern US and Canada in the spring. That was quite special…